Driving after Brexit

At the moment, UK driving licences may be used to drive anywhere in the EEA (this is the EU plus Iceland, Liechtenstein and Norway).

If Theresa May’s withdrawal agreement is passed, UK licences will still be valid for visiting EEA countries.

If the UK leaves the EU without a deal, then the situation gets complicated.

The government will try to do deals allowing UK licences to be recognised for visits to Europe. But if it doesn’t manage to do so, then drivers will need an International Driving Permit (IDP) for all EEA countries except the Republic of Ireland. IDPs can be bought at Post Offices for £5.50. You may also need to carry your UK driving licence.

There are three different types of IDP, known as the 1926, 1949 and 1968 IDPs – the numbers refer to the dates of the conventions on road traffic that established them.

  • The 1926 IDP will be needed for drivers wanting to visit Liechtenstein
  • The 1949 permit covers Spain, Iceland, Malta and Cyprus
  • The 1968 permit allows driving in all other EU countries, plus Norway and Switzerland

There will also be changes to the types of IDP you need to be able to drive in countries outside the EEA. For example, if you want to visit Turkey by car before 29 March, you will need a 1949 IDP – but after 29 March, you will need a 1968 IDP. You can find the full list of which IDP you need on this page.

IDPs apply only for visiting other countries. The government has said that if you are a UK licence-holder living in another EU country, then you need to exchange your UK licence for a licence issued by an EU country, before the UK leaves. If you wait until after the UK leaves, then you may need to take another driving test.

EU and EEA licenses will continue to be accepted in the UK for visitors and residents.

If the UK leaves the EU without a deal, you will also need to get a Green Card from your insurer to prove your car is covered.

The Green Card is only proof of a minimum level of third-party cover – it will not necessarily match the level of cover that you pay for in the UK. Check with your insurer to find out what level of cover you will get.

Taking your car to the EEA without a Green Card will be against the law.

The government recommends that you have a GB sticker on your car, even if you also have a GB symbol on your number plate.

You’ll need to carry your V5C log book with you if you own the car. If it is a car you have hired or leased then you will need to get a VE103 form to show you have permission to take it out of the UK.

Perhaps most inconveniently, if you are involved in a road traffic accident in an EEA country after a no-deal Brexit, then you may need to make a claim against the responsible driver or their insurer in the country where the accident happened.

And that could involve bringing the claim in the local language.

 

 

 

For the full article please click here to read the BBC News link 

 

 

New Trailer Plate Laws, S-P-M is ready for you

When it comes to being ready for the new ‘Trailer Plate Laws’, we leave the competition trailing !

From 28 March 2019, it will be a requirement for certain trailers travelling abroad to be registered with DVLA. When registered, trailers must display a trailer registration number plate as well as the registration number plate of the towing vehicle.

Registration plates must be supplied by registered number plate suppliers.

Rest assured, we are pleased to announce that S-P-M is ready;  the software on our patented Compact number plate system is already capable to produce these new trailer plates.

Please ring 0113 833 0407 to place your stock orders for this new requirement, the demand has already started and becomes law at the end of March 2019.

For the full details please click on this link

https://content.govdelivery.com/accounts/UKDVLA/bulletins/223e508

ARE YOU READY? – New changes on Trailer Plate Laws

Important information on trailer registration plates for registered number plate suppliers

For information regarding new trailer plate laws please click this link

https://content.govdelivery.com/accounts/UKDVLA/bulletins/223e508

For information on preparing to drive in the EU after Brexit please click this link

https://www.gov.uk/guidance/prepare-to-drive-in-the-eu-after-brexit

From 28 March 2019, it will be a requirement for certain trailers travelling abroad to be registered with DVLA. To give customers enough time to register, we aim to launch the service in January 2019. When registered, trailers must display a trailer registration number plate as well as the registration number plate of the towing vehicle.

Registration plates must be supplied by registered number plate suppliers. You may be asked to supply these plates so you will need the following information.

Trailer registration plate specifications

The trailer registration mark will consist of one letter followed by seven numbers. They will be grouped as one letter and three numbers followed by a group of four numbers, for example A123 4567 in this layout.

The plate should use the standard font and have the following characteristics:

  • characters should be 64 millimetres in height
  • have a width of 44 millimetres, except for the character representing the number ‘1’ and letter ‘I’, which must have a width of 10 millimetres
  • have a stroke width of 10 millimetres
  • be separated by 10 millimetres from any other characters within a group, groups of characters in the registration mark must be separated from one another by a space of 5 millimetres vertically
Important information on trailer registration plates
  • the width of the margin between the top or lateral edges of the registration plate and any part of a character used to display a registration mark on it must be at least 5 millimetres
  • the width of the margin between the bottom edge of the registration plate and any part of a character used to display a registration mark on it must be at least 13 millimetres

The trailer registration plate must have solid black characters on a white background. No material, other than a registration mark, may be displayed on a registration plate except for information that identifies the manufacturer of the registration plate.

Questions and answers

What is the trailer registration scheme and why has it been introduced?

Trailer registration scheme is a DVLA service for certain UK trailers used internationally. It is being introduced as part of the UK’s ratification of the 1968 Vienna Convention and to address the issues already faced by customers using UK trailers abroad.

Will every trailer in the UK be registered?

No, registration will be mandatory for all commercial use trailers travelling internationally that weigh over 750kg in gross weight. Registration is also mandatory for non-commercial use trailers that travel internationally and weigh over 3,500kg in gross weight.

How should the trailer registration plate be displayed?

The trailer registration plate must be fixed to the rear of the trailer in a position that is as far as reasonably practicable from the position of the towing vehicle registration plate. If it is not possible to fix a registration plate on the rear of the trailer, a registration plate must be fixed to both sides of the trailer and in such positions that in normal daylight the characters of the registration mark are easily distinguishable from either side of the trailer.

Do I need to register separately to become a supplier of trailer registration plates?

No, as long as you are a registered number plate supplier you will be able to supply trailer registration plates as well as vehicle registration plates.

I do not have all the necessary components to produce trailer registration plates. Where can I get them?

Your current supplier should be able to provide you with the vehicle registration plate components or equipment needed to produce trailer registration plates.

What documentation do I check?

As with vehicle registration plates customers will need to provide a document to confirm their identity and a document proving their entitlement to use the registration number. The list of acceptable documents can be found on the INF136. For trailer registration plates, customers should be able be able to provide the ‘UK trailer registration certificate’ (VTRC) or a ‘Trailer number plate authorisation certificate’ (eV948/2).

Is it compulsory to supply trailer registration plates?

No, it is down to each RNPS to decide if they will offer trailer registrations plates. DVLA will advise customers to check with their chosen supplier beforehand to ensure they are available.

Are RNPS required to keep a sales record for trailer registration plates sold?

You must keep records of number plate sales for three years and show them upon request to the police, DVLA, Driver and Vehicle Standards Agency (DVSA) and Trading Standards enforcement officers if they ask to see them. A sample template of a sales record can be found on the INF195/2.

 

S-P-M @ Automechanika UK 2019

Automechanika is the UK’s leading exhibition for the automotive aftermarket and vehicle production sector, and this year’s 2019 event was our busiest and best show yet.

After a successful and enjoyable three days at the show, we are now busy following up all the leads and interest we received from visitors.

We would like to thank customers old and new who visited our stand.

See you in Paris later this year and Frankfurt in 2020

Motorist rejects £10,000,000 offer for ‘world’s most expensive number plate’

THE owner of the ‘world’s most expensive number plate’ has turned down an offer of £10,000,000 for the plate.

BS AU 145e Update

BS AU 145e update

Earlier this year the BSI published a new specification regarding Retroreflecting Number Plates with the intention being to replace BS AU 145d. The DVLA was unable to finalise the details / content in time for its pre-arranged date before Parliament. This situation means that currently there is no change to the legislation and the proposed BS AU 145e has not been implemented.

Rest assured, as and when this new legislation comes into force, S-P-M’s software, systems and materials will be ready and fully compliant and of course we will update you accordingly.

Special ‘Green Plates’ Plan For Ultra Low-Emission Vehicles

A forthcoming consultation will float the idea of recognising low-emission cars and vans by issuing them with special number plates. Low-emission cars may soon sport green-coloured number plates under new government plans to promote clean vehicles.

It’s not yet clear which vehicles would be entitled to show the green plates.

While green number plates will be positive PR for low-emission car makers and early adopters of the technology alike, to be truly effective any such initiative will need to at the same time shame the drivers of the most polluting vehicles; an electric or hydrogen-powered vehicle might sport a green plate, but the biggest gas guzzlers would have theirs branded red. Some French cities have already adopted an emissions-based vignette window sticker scheme using a range of six colours that recognises the fact that it is clumsy to simply brand one class of vehicle as being ‘clean’. 

For more info please use these links

Green number plates for clean cars

https://www.huffingtonpost.co.uk/entry/special-green-plates_uk_5b94e17de4b0511db3e3312d?ncid=other_homepage_tiwdkz83gze&utm_campaign=mw_entry_recirc

 

Driving Licences Revoked Due To Poor Eyesight

Police forces in Thames Valley, Hampshire and the West Midlands are stopping motorists and immediately revoking their drivers licences if they fail a series of simple tests.

Every motorist must pass the test before being allowed to carry on with their journey. It is suspected that 1000’s of drivers everyday drive on UK roads with poor eyesight.

If the driver is unable to clearly read a number plate from 20 metres away they will be prevented from proceeding.

Are you one of the 28% of drivers who name their cars?

Research by DVLA shows that over a quarter of UK motorists have named their car, with 28% of those surveyed saying that they had given their car a name.

‘Doris’, ‘Dave’, ‘Henry’, ‘Betsy’ and ‘Bumble’ were popular choices, with the largest proportion of those who said they named their car coming from the East Midlands (28%). The smallest proportion came from Northern Ireland, Scotland and Wales (1%, 3% and 6% respectively).

Women were almost twice as likely to give their car a name as men (65% and 35% respectively), with the majority of people who said they name their cars aged between 55 and 64 (41% within this age group said they gave their car a name).

The make, model, colour and ‘general look’ of the car were the common reasons given for the choice of name, with Fords, Vauxhalls, Toyotas, BMWs and Hyundais being the makes of vehicle most frequently given a name.

With 87% saying they had bought a personalised registration to match the name they give to their car, this could explain some of the obscure personalised registrations seen on cars.

DVLA Personalised Registrations sales manager Jody Davies said:

We sold DOR 1S, DAV 3S, HEN 2Y and HER 81E in the past, as well as personalised registrations where the meaning and significance seems much less obvious. It’s no surprise to find that people want to say something about their car in this way – whether the name is something personal to them or a bit of fun that they want to share with others.

Personalised registrations can be sold at auction for varying – and sometimes very large – amounts of money, but online they start from £250 so getting the ideal plate for your car could be less expensive than you may have thought.

In the last financial year 2017 to 2018, the sale of personalised registrations by DVLA raised over £160 million for HM Treasury. With around 50 million personalised registrations for sale on DVLA’s website, motorists can find out if their car’s name is available with just a few clicks.

Notes to editors

The personalised registrations referred to in the text were sold by DVLA at auction as follows:

  • DOR 1S – £6,800 September 1990
  • DAV 3S – £9,100 September 1999
  • HER 81E – £7,000 January 2003
  • HEN 2Y – £6,300 June 2005

The prices quoted above do not include VAT on the ‘hammer price’ listed; the buyer’s premium (+VAT) and DVLA assignment fees.

For the financial year 2017 to 2018, the sale of personalised registrations by DVLA generated £161,902,560 revenue for HM Treasury, including VAT and assignment fees.

Names that appeared more than once were:

  • The Beast
  • Betsy
  • Bertie
  • Bumble
  • Dave
  • Doris
  • Henry
  • Herb / Herbie
  • Landy
  • Sparky

Click here to access DVLA Press release https://www.gov.uk/government/news/over-a-quarter-of-uk-motorists-name-their-cars-according-to-new-research